Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Diversity @Barrie

Student Voices


 

Welcome

From the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion - Maati Wafford
Welcome from Maati Wafford, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Welcome from the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion - Maati Wafford
Maati Wafford works collaboratively with faculty and administrators to enhance the many aspects of Barrie’s diversity work. She began as an active member on the Diversity Task Force, the group responsible for crafting Barrie's diversity statement. She provides service and expertise as the school works to include diversity in more formalized ways. 

Read More about Welcome from Maati Wafford, Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Celebrating Diversity
Diversity is one of Barrie's fundamental core values. We honor and celebrate the uniqueness of each individual and embrace each person’s beliefs, experiences, values, and perspectives in support of our inclusive and welcoming community. Barrie does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, or a person's status as a qualified candidate with a disability in administration of its educational program, admission policies, financial aid program, staff hiring and other school-administered programs.

The deadly shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue shook the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh.

CreditCreditGene J. Puskar/Associated Press

Events

On January 30 and March 8, 2019, Barrie parents attended the Parent Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Alliance Collaboration Circle to review a video and discuss topics about diversity and inclusion while enjoying light refreshments.

All parents interested in fostering a diverse, inclusive community at Barrie are invited to join the Alliance.

Read More about Diversity Event - March 8

Barrie parent Dr. Jeff Menzise, reflected on his personal journeys to Africa, while leading a discussion about African heritage, international travel, and the culture and symbolism of Ghana, West Africa. Students and parents gathered as a community of learners to share, reflect and discuss these topics in a fun and informative way.

Read More about Equity in Education

Barrie parents came together on November 7th to kick off this year's Parent Diversity Alliance. This group was formed in order to create an intentional space for parents to incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion perspectives into their daily lives.

Read More about Barrie Parent Diversity Alliance

What's Happening?


Diversity is one of Barrie's fundamental core values. We honor and celebrate the uniqueness of each individual and embrace each person’s beliefs, experiences, values, and perspectives in support of our inclusive and welcoming community. Barrie does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, or a person's status as a qualified candidate with a disability in administration of its educational program, admission policies, financial aid program, staff hiring and other school-administered programs.

Resources

What We Mean When We Say, “Toxic Masculinity”

As a consumer of news and a classroom teacher, how can I help my students make sense of the current news cycle? The term “toxic masculinity” can be useful vocabulary for these conversations.

 

Colleen Clemens

 

Guide for Selecting

Anti-Bias Children’s Books

By Louise Derman-Sparks
Based on “Ten Quick Ways to Analyze Children’s Books for Racism and Sexism.” Updated in 2013.*

 

Arts & Activism

"I'm not in the business of trying to demonize our Founding Fathers. I don't really think there's any benefit to that. But I'm also not trying to deify them. "


Refections on Advocacy for Gun Control- Anna Cronin class of 2019

On Wednesday, February 21, around 30 students went downtown to protest gun control because of the recent events in Parkland Florida. The protest began by word of mouth around Montgomery County public schools and we decided to join them. We walked out of school at 9:30 and took the metro to Union Station where we marched to Capitol Hill. There were hundreds of high school students pouring out of the station and marching. At least a couple thousands of students gathered at the capital and then walked down the mall to the White House where we all sat down in front of it. By the end of the march, thousands of students had shown up to protest. The whole crowd was full teenagers who want change in the government and stricter gun laws because the recent events, and ones in years past, are unacceptable. It was an incredibly rewarding experience to see so many teenagers voice their opinions. There were adults honking at us in support and lining the sidewalks to cheer us on. The protest was more than successful and larger than any of us had hoped.